About Schools Week

Schools Week is read widely by headteachers, school leaders, governors, business managers, policy experts and the education leaders of the future. We have quickly become the “go-to” news source for reliable education journalism, with a formidable reputation for hard-hitting investigations, breaking news and expert analysis. Trust is essential, and our readers know that Schools Week provides an unrivalled platform for sharing accurate, timely information, and always putting schools first.

View All Schools/Education Jobs

Latest Jobs

Recruiter Outside of the UK The British School in The Netherlands (the BSN) You will source and build communication channels for a range of roles at our four Campuses. Together with the hiring managers you will evaluate, network and bring in top talent from around the globe i...
Teacher of History London Harris Academy Falconwood We are looking for a dynamic NQT or experienced Teacher of History. What we are looking for: We want to appoint staff who will make a difference to the Harris Academy Falconwood during this exciting a...

View All Latest Jobs

In the News

Private school in rare move to re-brand as ‘grammar school’

A private school in the West Midlands has taken the unusual step of rebranding as a “grammar school”, and will focus on training its primary pupils for the 11-plus test. St Dominic’s Brewood, an all-through independent school in Staffordshire, has changed its name to St Dominic’s Grammar School and introduced the 11-plus for new pupils hoping to join in year seven. The school educates girls from the age of two to 18 and boys aged two to 11, and leaders intend to use the change to “focus on the 11+ in the preparatory end”, and teach younger pupils to pass the controversial test. According to headteacher Peter McNabb, a new “strict program of study” will enable children to “access surrounding grammar schools”, whether they are fee- or non-fee-paying. The name change has been popular amongst parents. None have shown or expressed concerns The school will also use a “rigorous mentoring system” for all GCSE and A-level students, to ensure they reach their potential, he said. Although it is common for private schools that used to be selective state schools to continue to use the name “grammar school”, it is rarer for one that has not previously used the 11-plus to...

INVESTIGATION: Did schools reinvest their money from playing field sales?

Schools are not using money raised from selling playing fields into new sports facilities despite promises to the contrary, a Schools Week investigation has revealed. Schools and councils with surplus land, including disused playing fields, can seek government permission to sell it off but, in most cases, are obliged to use at least some of the proceeds to fund new outdoor education facilities. In 2014-15, the Department for Education signed off on 23 so-called land disposals – giving rise to headlines that playing fields were being sold at a rate of one every fortnight. But, of the 14 projects for which Schools Week received updates, we found seven had not yet gone ahead and one had been abandoned altogether, at a cost of hundreds of thousands of pounds. Banbury Academy in Oxfordshire had hoped to sell part of its playing fields for housing, and the sale was expected to pay for new facilities including an artificial sports field, a climbing wall and a refurbished sports hall. But the land did not attract bids high enough to make the sale worthwhile, even though the school’s sponsor, the Aspirations Academies Trust, spent around £400,000 on the project. If land values do pick...

Labour should move on from the academies debate, says Angela Rayner

The Labour Party should “move on” from the debate over academies and focus on campaigning for greater controls over the way they are run, the shadow education secretary has said. Speaking to Schools Week ahead of the Labour Party conference, Angela Rayner no longer wants to get “bogged down” in debates on the merits of certain types of school, and will instead pursue the government on the use of public money. This marks a departure from the party’s strident anti-academies stance and raises questions on the role local authorities would play under a future Labour government. The MP for Ashton-under-Lyne, who has been in post for 14 months, still believes in “local accountability and local say” over where schools should open, but she is not “fixated on local authorities” as the solution to all problems in the system. “I’m not going backwards – I’m going forwards,” she says when we meet in her Westminster office. “Most parents, including me, are interested in a good school that their kids can go to. They don’t care what it’s called, quite frankly.” Despite this very obvious softening of Labour’s position, it is clear that to Rayner, the academies system is still far from...

Petition over teacher pension gender inequality gathers pace

A petition to force the government to equalise the way teachers’ pensions transfer to their partners is gathering strength. Under the current system male teachers who accrued pension between 1972 and 1988 can pass 50 per cent of the final amount to their wives if they die after retirement, but this privilege does not extend either to husbands of female teachers or individuals in same-sex relationships. A landmark ruling made by the Supreme Court has however recently left the door ajar for a change in the rules. Judges ruled in favour of John Walker, an employee at the chemicals company Innospec, who argued that if he died, his male partner should receive survivors’ benefits based on the total number of years he paid into the company pension scheme, rather than on just his service from December 5, 2005, when civil partnerships were first introduced in the UK. The cost of redressing the imbalance would be huge The court agreed with him that this would have been the case had he been married to a woman, and declared a certain clause in the 2010 Equality Act as “incompatible with EU law”. Following the decision, campaigners have launched a petition to convince...