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Teacher in Mathematics Outside of the UK The British School in The Netherlands (the BSN) We are looking for a full time Teacher of Mathematics to join our Senior School Voorschoten team from September 2017. The successful candidate will form part of a team of professionals who work in a l...
Teacher of Science South East The Ashcombe School . The Science department is one of the largest in the school, with 11 fully equipped laboratories; 2 of which can be converted into computer rooms. There is a very good ethos of cooperative and suppor...

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In the News

Teachers work nearly 11 hours a day, landmark workload survey reveals

Teachers are working an average of 54.4 hours a week – nearly 11 hours per day – the government’s first comprehensive survey into workload has revealed. Primary classroom teachers and middle leaders work an average of over 55 hours, with secondary school teachers working more than 53 hours a week, the government’s long-awaited Teacher Workload Survey found. However the working hours reported by senior leaders were even higher at 60 hours per week. Secondary school senior leaders worked 62-hour weeks – which equates to 12.4 hours a day. The findings were “markedly higher” than the 45.9 hours per week recorded in the 2013 Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS), which measured the workload of secondary teachers. The government report stated this suggests “some increase in workload has been seen between 2013 and 2016”. The government has stated it will now use the findings to “target our work at the areas of most concern”. But Chris Keates, general secretary of NASUWT (pictured right), said: “Once again, the Government’s own data confirms that teachers and headteachers are dealing with unsustainable workload demands on a daily basis, and much of their time is being spent on activities which are either unnecessary or which...

How to prepare year 6 for KS2 maths SATs

Education blogger @thatboycanteach explains what we can learn from studying the 2016 Key Stage 2 SATs results After the release of RAISEonline’s QLA data, teachers, Maths coordinators, and SLT alike will have scrambled to analyse the initial report on 2016s maths SATs results. It’s a resource with huge potential, offering ways for us to reconsider the effectiveness of our teaching and learning strategies by showing us what our pupils didn’t learn. However, like many of its kind, it can be difficult to interpret. In short – it is a slog. So which questions do the nation’s 10 and 11 year olds seem to be struggling with most? Below is a brief appraisal of where pupils fared worst, and why. Let’s begin with the KS2 SATs reasoning tests – which account for 70 out of 110 marks and cover a range of curriculum objectives from years 3 to 6. 1. Pupils struggle to problem solve The four most poorly answered questions were problem solving in nature, requiring a child to be able to approach several mathematical facts while using a variety of strategies. This multi-tasking proved troublesome for pupils, particularly question 17 from paper two, where pupils had to halve, use inverse operations...

Councils paid £100k to write to parents about UTCs

The government has handed out more than £100,000 in funding to councils to enable them to write to parents promoting post-14 education options like University Technical Colleges. A new rule requiring councils to make parents aware of schools with ‘atypical points of admission’ came into effect on February 14, and councils have now received funding equivalent to 20p per pupil to pay for the administrative cost of the requirement. It comes after parliament voted to force schools to let UTCs, colleges and apprenticeship providers promote their learning opportunities to pupils, and follows a long-running dispute over the effectiveness of careers advice in schools. Under the new regulations, councils must write – either by post or email – to parents of pupils due to move into year 10 in September and must outline the other post-14 study options in their area. In a model letter sent to councils by the Department for Education, both UTCs and studio schools are mentioned specifically, and parents are advised to urge their child to speak to a careers adviser in their school or college. Councils are allowed to decide which institutions to promote. In guidance to the authorities, Mary Pooley, deputy director of the Education Funding...

Asbestos ‘significant cause for concern’ in over 100 schools

Nearly one in five schools are failing to manage asbestos properly – with the government having to intervene in more than 100 schools found to be a “significant cause for concern”. The government’s first comprehensive survey of asbestos in school buildings, published today, found 83.1 per cent of those that responded (5,592) contained the life-threatening fibrous material. Nearly one in five were not fully compliant with asbestos requirements – lacking either fully document management plans, asbestos procedures, or were unaware asbestos was present. But 114 of those schools (2 per cent) were discovered to be a “significant cause for concern” and required government intervention. The Department for Education (DfE) said it emailed those schools and received “reassurances” the asbestos is now safe. But Chris Keates, general secretary of teachers’ union NASUWT, said: “Given this was a voluntary process with only 25 per cent of schools responding, it is reasonable to assume that schools who know they are not compliant would be less likely to respond. “Therefore the true number who are failing to comply could be substantially higher, with hundreds of schools putting pupils and teachers at risk by failing to manage asbestos effectively.” The report follows a warning from...