About Schools Week

Schools Week is read widely by headteachers, school leaders, governors, business managers, policy experts and the education leaders of the future. We have quickly become the “go-to” news source for reliable education journalism, with a formidable reputation for hard-hitting investigations, breaking news and expert analysis. Trust is essential, and our readers know that Schools Week provides an unrivalled platform for sharing accurate, timely information, and always putting schools first.

View All Schools/Education Jobs

Latest Jobs

Midday Supervisor Assistant South East Charles Darwin Primary Charles Darwin Primary Salary: £3,677 (£16,394 full time equivalent) Fixed term for 1 year Part time, 10 hours per week Term time only Starting September 2018 Charles Darwin Primary in Norw...
Teacher of Business London Harris Academy South Norwood Located five minutes from Norwood Junction train station, a transport hub ten minutes' train journey from London Bridge, Harris Academy South Norwood has belonging and personal growth as our touch...

View All Latest Jobs

In the News

‘Inadequate’ Gloucestershire free school to close

A free school in Gloucestershire awarded the worst inspection rating by Ofsted will close this summer. St Anthony’s School in the Forest of Dean has been in special measures since 2015, and was rated ‘inadequate’ again by Ofsted after an inspection just before Christmas. In February, the school was issued with a pre-termination warning notice and told to provide a clear action plan for improvement. However, Lisa Mannall, the regional schools commissioner for the south-west, confirmed the school will close in a letter to the chair of trustees this week. The 107-pupil primary school is running at a deficit and “does not have a credible plan to secure its future viability”. An improvement plan submitted in February “did not adequately detail how school improvement would be achieved” and a revised plan was described as having only “minor amendments”. There is “no sponsor with capacity to whom we could re-broker the school” and so the school will close in August. Mannall acknowledged that headteacher Lorna Middleton had “made determined efforts to improve the quality of education” since she took up her post in September 2017, and that recently-appointed trustees “have shown significant dedication to the work of improving the school”. However,...

Academies will need government approval for related-party transactions

Academies that want to buy services in from companies run by their leaders will soon need to get permission from the government under new rules proposed by the Department for Education. The DfE agrees with a recommendation made by the parliamentary public accounts committee earlier this year that academy trusts should be forced to clear so-called “related-party transactions” with the Education and Skills Funding Agency. In its response, the government said it would implement the change “during the 2018-19 academic year”, which begins this September. The new rule will be fully in place by August 2019. Related-party transactions are deals between academy trusts and linked private companies. For example, a trust buying services from a company run by one of its members or trustees, or one of their family members, counts as a related-party transaction. In a damning report on the state of academy spending released in March, the PAC warned that the DfE’s current rules, which allow such transactions as long as no-one profits from the deals, are “too weak”. Working out what constitutes the cost of providing a service “can be complex and open to manipulation”, the committee warned, and it is therefore difficult to prove that services are...

Social Mobility Commission gets new chair – but no new powers

Dame Martina Milburn, the head of the Prince’s Trust, has been nominated to chair the Social Mobility Commission. But the Department for Education has ruled out expanding the organisation’s powers, despite calls to that effect from senior MPs. The commission, which sits within the DfE and monitors progress towards improved social mobility, has been without a chair or board since December, when ex-Labour cabinet minister Alan Milburn resigned as chair, taking the remaining four members with him. At the time, members, including former education secretary Baroness Shephard complained of the government’s lack of progress towards a “fairer Britain”. In March, the parliamentary education committee demanded extra powers for the commission, including the power to publish impact assessments on social justice in legislative proposals. MPs also want a social justice minister appointed, and said the commission should be renamed “the Social Justice Commission”. But in its response, the DfE today said it would not be making the changes proposed by the committee, because government departments are “best placed” to consider the impact of policy and legislative proposals on social justice, “as they are the experts in their policy areas”. Robert Halfon, the chair of the education committee, said the government had “sadly failed to seize”...

Grammar school expansion money ‘won’t improve outcomes’

The expansion of grammar schools is “unlikely to bring benefits for young people” as selective schools do not offer better social, emotional or educational outcomes than non-selective establishments. Instead of encouraging existing grammar schools to expand, the government should focus its funding on improving education “for all young people”, according to a new study. Earlier this month, the government launched renewed calls for grammar schools to take advantage of a £200 million expansion fund, set up in 2016 to cover capital costs for new classrooms. In exchange, they must widen access to disadvantaged pupils. However, analysis of pupils’ attainment, engagement and wellbeing at school and their future aspirations by the UCL Institute of Education found that attending a grammar school had “no positive impact” on pupils’ self-esteem, attitude to school, future aspirations or vocabulary at age 14. The study analysed data from 883 pupils in England and 733 in Northern Ireland who had similar academic achievements at primary school and came from families with similar incomes and education levels. All the pupils selected were from the Millennium Cohort Study, which follows the lives of around 19,000 children born in the UK between 2000 and 2001. Researchers compared the results of tests children had...